Author Archives: Tom Dalton

Trouble shooting that problematic window neon sign

neon-blog-post

So, your neon sign doesn’t appear to be broken, but has started flickering or just won’t come on at all. Don’t panic… try these steps first.

If the sign illuminates but a tube FLICKERs:

Pull the “on/off” pull-chain (on the power supply) …pull quickly on and off two or three times ending with it off …then wait for 1 minute. Turn it on again and the problem should go away within a few minutes (if this fix is going to work at all). Repeat this ON/OFF procedure a couple of times if needed. If it is a new sign and it still flickers after trying this “fix”, then leave the sign ON for approximately one week (24 hours a day). Sometimes it takes time for the internal gases to settle.  Also, it may require up to 48 hours to achieve full brightness from the first time a new sign turned on.

If the sign turns on for only a few seconds then turns off:

The neon glass probably has a small hairline crack somewhere which has lets the neon gas out. The sign will need to be repaired by a neon tube bender.

If the sign has DIM letters within a few days of getting the new sign:

The sign needs a little bit more time to light up. Turn the sign on for 24 hours/day and keep it lit at least a week. This should fix the problem.

If the sign will not come on at all, not even for a split second:

Try to plug it into at a different wall outlet that you know is working. If it still doesn’t light up at all, it may be the power adaptor/transformer.
The adaptor/transformer from most manufacturers is warrantied for 1 year, so contact them for a replacement or to purchase a new transformer is it is out of warranty.

If a one year old sign has DIM areas:

Take the sign down, plug it in and turn it on. Hold the sign up over your head facing you. Be very carful not to touch the neon glass as it breaks very easily. Locate the very tiny mercury balls inside of the glass tubing. After you see them, tilt your sign so the tiny balls move to the area of the tubing that is not lighting up. After redistributing the mercury balls, leave the sign on for 20 minutes. If this was the issue, then it will regain its full brightness in the dim areas. If it is older than a few years, it may also need to be re-pumped with neon gas.

Tom Dalton

I first started making signs back in the early 90's. On January first 2000 I started Signs Direct as an online company specializing in making sign purchases easy and economical. Signs Direct, Inc. specializes in traffic and parking signs, customized neon signs, sign holders and sign stands, as well as banners and sign making materials.

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Why do red sign graphics fade first?

FADED-RED

 

This OSHA safety sign isn’t far from our business.  You’ll often see signs like this where the red is almost gone and the other colors aren’t faded too bad.  So, what are the reasons why red fades first?

First, lets define UV light. Ultraviolet (UV) light is an electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength from 400 nm to 100 nm (shorter than that of visible light).  Lets also assume that UV light is what causes fading. UV light has a shorter wavelength than visible light.  Light with a shorter wavelength has more energy than light with a long wavelength.

Short wavelength visible light (like blue) is more toward the UV end of the visible light spectrum (*see spectrum image) so therefore it is a shorter wavelength and has more energy. Longer wavelength visible light (like red) is more toward the the infrared end of the visible spectrum and therefore has less energy. Because of their greater energy, the shorter wavelengths of light cause more “bleaching” of the pigments in the paint and more fading. So, why would light with a very short wavelength effect RED more than Black? The main reason has to do with what light is reflected by each color and what light is absorbed. Red ink or pigment reflects the long wavelength light (like red) and absorbs the more destructive higher energy shorter wavelength light like the blues and greens.  

WAVELENGTH

SilverBlue and white graphics will reflect the short wavelength colors better (and therefore reflect more UV light) so they’ll fade slower.

I’m not an expert on how light affects pigment, but this is what I’ve compiled based on my research and discussions with others. Now you’ve got an answer when a customer asks why his red sign faded quicker than his blue sign.

 

Tom Dalton

I first started making signs back in the early 90's. On January first 2000 I started Signs Direct as an online company specializing in making sign purchases easy and economical. Signs Direct, Inc. specializes in traffic and parking signs, customized neon signs, sign holders and sign stands, as well as banners and sign making materials.

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Which outdoor sidewalk sign stand is “the best”?

iPhone-Signicade

Asking which outdoor sidewalk sign stand is “the best” is a little like asking a carpenter “which tool is the best”. They’d likely say “it depends on what you’re trying to do”.

Other than print size, there are four main considerations when picking an outdoor sign stand.

  1. What kind of print do I want to use?
  2. How much do I want to spend?
  3. Do I need high Wind Resistance?
  4. Do I need a certain aesthetic?

Print Type:

When users ask “what kind of print can this stand hold” they might be saying they want a stand that holds a paper print because that is a limitation of the large format printer that they have available. Prints can be divided into TWO types.  They are either “thin flexible prints” or “rigid prints”.  Typically “thin flexible prints” are either made with laminated paper (card stock) or 030 styrene. The outdoor sign stands that work with thin flexible prints will almost always have a snap-frame to hold the print. The other type of print is a “rigid print” and signs that hold a “rigid print” will have either a slot to slide your panel into or they may just have a flat surface that you screw your rigid panel onto.  The a-frame signicade (pictured above) is a perfect example of a widely used rigid print sign stand. It is holding a 4mm thick corrugated plastic sign panel. While a person could tape a paper print onto it, that is not its intended use.

Cost:

This is a bit of a loaded question. For example, the signicade is usually about $10 cheaper than the signicade deluxe. So, while the regular signicade looks cheaper at first glance …the regular signicade requires that you come up with a way to attach your sign.  After you buy velcro or “well-nuts” or two sided tape to attach your sign to a regular signicade …you likely could have purchased the signicade deluxe which comes with a quick-change feature to hold your sign panels.  Another example is “snap frame stands”. They can cost two or three times the cost of a signicade, but unlike the signicade ….they hold thin paper prints.  So, if you have the equipment to print on laminated paper real cheap in your print room, then over the long run you’ll pay more for the signicade after you’ve purchased a large number of more expensive rigid prints from a printing company (signicades typically use prints on 4mm corrugated plastic panels).

Wind Resistance:

The stands that don’t hold water and have no springs and don’t swing will have the least resistance to the wind.  One example would be the poly “Quik Sign” stand. It is light weight and a light performer in the wind.  The fancy systems for fighting the wind (like springs) also tend to add a lot to the cost of the stand.  For example, the “wind master” line of stands performs great in the wind but also comes with a higher price tag than most of our other outdoor stands.  All of them are waterproof.

Aesthetics:

This is a very subjective consideration. In most cases you’ll want a neutral aesthetic so that you can switch your graphics around without ever clashing with the sign stand.  The black and white signicade a-frames are probably the most neutral in appearance.  The QLA and sidewalk swinger stands have a noticeably modern look.  The wind master line of stands have a certain cold/sterile/utilitarian appeal and look at home in front of industrial complex or corporate looking franchise. If you need something incredibly warm and rustic, I’d recommend crafting an a-frame stand out of well warn barn boards and a few hinges and a bit of chain.  For a country appeal, no plastic product will match that handmade look.

As always, if you still don’t know what sign stand to order, call Signs Direct for advice ..toll free 877-706-4601

Tom Dalton

I first started making signs back in the early 90's. On January first 2000 I started Signs Direct as an online company specializing in making sign purchases easy and economical. Signs Direct, Inc. specializes in traffic and parking signs, customized neon signs, sign holders and sign stands, as well as banners and sign making materials.

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3 common mistakes made when installing u-channel sign posts

bad-uchannels

Don’t let your u-channel post installation look like this…

These signs look terrible. So, what happened here? I found three big mistakes when investigating the installation of these u-channel sign posts.  There might have been a fourth mistake as well.  I wasn’t there when they installed these posts, but they could’ve installed them crooked in the first place, but that is unlikely ..but that would be the fourth mistake.  Here are the known mistakes…

Mistake #1 was that they weren’t installed deep enough into the ground. I pulled one out and found they were only about 24 inches deep. In our area, posts should be 36 inches deep to get below the frost line and avoid something called “frost heave”.  The frost line is different in every area of the country. Do a google search for “frost line map” and you’ll find a map showing the depth of the frost line in your area. If you’ve ever squeezed a watermelon seed between your fingers and shot it across the room then you understand the principle behind “frost heave”.  Even in warm climates I’d go 36″ deep and then go even deeper for cold climates to get at least 3 or 4 inches below that area’s frost line.

Mistake #2 was going with a 1.12 lb post. A lot of people use these for signs, but their intended purpose is to hold reflective delineators. I see them used for signs everywhere. I recommend a 2 lb post for parking signs.  A 2 lb post is a post that if cut into a 1 foot long section would weigh 2lbs.  So, with that in mind you’ll see that the 2 lb post uses almost twice the steel of a 1.12 lb u-channel post.  When inspecting the posts pictured above, some were actually bent at the point where the post went into the ground.

Mistake #3 had nothing to do with how crooked these sign posts are.  Mistake #3 was how they installed their signs.  The posts make a “U” shape when viewed from above.  In that “U” shape, the sign would go along the top of the “U” and not the bottom.  When you bolt them against the bottom of the “U” shape they are less stable and can rock back and forth easier than if installed against the top of the “U” shape.

In conclusion, installing u-channel posts isn’t rocket science.  It is super easy if you’re aware of just a few common mistakes. Once you’re aware of the mistakes you’ll see just how common they are.

Tom Dalton

I first started making signs back in the early 90's. On January first 2000 I started Signs Direct as an online company specializing in making sign purchases easy and economical. Signs Direct, Inc. specializes in traffic and parking signs, customized neon signs, sign holders and sign stands, as well as banners and sign making materials.

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The Sign Shoppe, Episode 3 – Bad Logo Designed By Client

bad logo design

Carol has a challenge. A new client wants to use a really bad logo for his new business signage. The challenge is his wife created the logo. How can Carol help him without offending? Ray is no help at all, but the Boss has a few ideas. Watch now.

Tom Dalton

I first started making signs back in the early 90's. On January first 2000 I started Signs Direct as an online company specializing in making sign purchases easy and economical. Signs Direct, Inc. specializes in traffic and parking signs, customized neon signs, sign holders and sign stands, as well as banners and sign making materials.

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ADA Rules Make Access Easy

ADA Rules

In American history, few regulations have impacted business like those contained in Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Title III of the ADA regulates access to buildings and parking lots for people with disabilities to create access and prevent unintended discrimination. The regulations contained within title III cover things like entrances, ramps and parking spaces. The regulations in title III of the ADA also cover the familiar handicap signs that accompany accessible entrances, ramps and parking spaces. This article will cover some highlighted regulations from title III of the ADA, as well as a little information on the famous symbol emblazoned up handicap signs and handicap parking signs around the world.

ada-handicap-parking-space

According to the Department of Justice (n.d.), there must be an accessible route connecting handicapped parking spaces to accessible building entrances. If the private entity that owns the building is not in charge of the parking, then it is not necessary for them to comply, although the technical manual of the ADA encourages making the request to the appropriate governing body.

The number of necessary handicap spaces in a parking lot depends on a number of things. For instance, a parking lot with 100 spaces needs four handicap spaces, which is obviously only 4 percent. If the building is a medical care facility, where people may stay more than 24 hours, or where emergencies are handled, then 10 percent of the parking spaces need to be handicap, no matter the total number. Furthermore, if the building is a medical rehab facility that specializes in treating people with impaired mobility, then a full 20 percent of the parking spots must be handicapped.

Anyone who has ever wondered why icons like “low beam” and “windshield wiper” always look the same in every car should only look to ISO 7001 for explanation. Additional to the many well-known symbols contained within that standard is the International Symbol of Access (ISA) that emblazons handicap parking signs around the world. The ISA on handicap signs is the familiar white stick figure in a wheelchair, usually on a blue background. While the ADA may be an American law, the symbol used on handicap parking signs is international. In fact, the ISA is standardized by the International Standards Organization under the ISO 7001 standard.

The ISA isn’t only used for handicap parking spaces either; to comply with the ADA, they must also appear at passenger loading zones, accessible entrances and restrooms, if not every aforementioned area in a particular area is accessible.

The ISA is actually a copyrighted image. The copyright is held by the International Commission on Technology and Accessibility. The image was originally designed in 1968 by Susanne Koefoed, but according to Wikipedia, it was Karl Montan who made the final modification of giving the figure a head to make it the symbol known today. Now, handicap signs and handicap parking spaces everywhere display the symbol.

The ADA itself is not the only bit deserving of praise for raising the level of accessibility in the United States. Although the ADA is a law and it’s enforced by penalties, the cooperation of businesses across the country has helped the disabled, and proved that government and business can combine to make the world a better place.

References

(N.D.). “International Symbol of Access.” Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Symbol_of_Access

(N.D.). “Americans with Disabilities Act: ADA Title III Technical Assistance Manual Covering Public Accommodations and Commercial Facilities.” Department of Justice. Retrieved from http://www.ada.gov/taman3.html

(2013). “The International Language of ISO Graphical Symbols.” International Standards Organization. Retrieved from http://www.iso.org/iso/graphical-symbols_booklet.pdf

Tom Dalton

I first started making signs back in the early 90's. On January first 2000 I started Signs Direct as an online company specializing in making sign purchases easy and economical. Signs Direct, Inc. specializes in traffic and parking signs, customized neon signs, sign holders and sign stands, as well as banners and sign making materials.

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Safety Orange: Blazing Through the Sky

safety signs

If only scientists had determined what color stands out best against the blue sky so they may use that color for safety signs. Oh wait a minute, scientists have figured this out! The color is called “safety orange” and it’s the natural complimenting color to azure – the sky’s blue color. Safety orange can be seen on all sorts of items, from construction signs to hunter hats. This article will take a look at the generals and specifics regarding this shade of orange as well as its use in safety signs.

safety-orange-construction

What is safety orange

Would the orange color of a sign by any other name be as noticeable? Not to get Shakespearean, but safety orange gets called a lot of things, although according to OSHA, it’s the same color. In fact, safety orange is also called OSHA orange. Other names for safety orange include blaze orange, vivid orange, hunter orange, and for some reason, Omaha orange.

For anyone who is interested, safety orange is actually called Omaha orange because a thrifty man from Ford Brothers Van & Storage in Omaha was looking for an affordable color to paint his trucks. Those trucks became known as Allied Van Lines, and they are Omaha orange to this day. The color came from the mixing of leftover paint, after the thrifty man made a deal.

The color orange is halfway between yellow and red on the color spectrum. In safety signs, yellow means caution and red means danger. Safety orange is a little beyond halfway between yellow and red on the visible light spectrum; it’s closer to red, which also places safety orange closer to danger on the safety spectrum. For OSHA compliance, safety orange is used to denote that parts of a machine are dangerous or energized.

Safety orange also must be worn by hunters to stay safe in the forest. Replica guns are required to have safety orange tips, to help clue law enforcement and others into the fact that it’s a fake gun. Perhaps safety orange is most widely recognized as the color of traffic cones and barrels. As mentioned earlier, safety orange works terrific for safety signs in road construction sites, due to its complementary contrast to the azure blue sky. Next to the sky, an Omaha orange safety sign will stand out the same way black letters do on a white sheet of paper.

How are colors used in safety signs

Safety orange isn’t the only color used for OSHA compliance in safety signs. OSHA actually has a safety code for signs using all the colors of the rainbow. As already mentioned, to OSHA, red means danger, orange is between red and yellow, and yellow means caution. Next on the spectrum is safety green, which according to OSHA is used to denote safety routes, exits and first aid kits. A safety blue sign will give important safety information. Currently, OSHA recognizes a safety purple, but has not defined what it means. Black, white and yellow used together typically denote traffic.

When it comes to making safety signs, there’s more to the message on them for OSHA compliance. Colors have meanings in the realm of safety, and whether people know the definitions of the OSHA safety colors or not, the connotations are there.

References

(N.D.). “Description for Ford Brothers Van & Storage.” DexKnows. Retrieved from http://www.dexknows.com/business_profiles/ford_brothers_van_and_storage-b1558714

(N.D.). “Safety Orange.” Wikipedia. Retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safety_orange

(N.D.). “Safety Orange Cross.” Seiyaku.com. Retrieved from http://www.seiyaku.com/customs/crosses/safety-orange.html#sup04

(2013). “Safety Sign and Marking Requirements.” Grainger. Retrieved from http://www.grainger.com/content/qt-safety-sign-marking-requirements-201

Tom Dalton

I first started making signs back in the early 90's. On January first 2000 I started Signs Direct as an online company specializing in making sign purchases easy and economical. Signs Direct, Inc. specializes in traffic and parking signs, customized neon signs, sign holders and sign stands, as well as banners and sign making materials.

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The Sign Shoppe, Episode 2

Ray gets a harsh lesson on sign design. Carol wonders if she’ll take a pay cut. Ray comes up with a job-saving creative idea for a sign, and returns to his boss’s good graces as the coveted “Star Employee”. Watch now.

 

Tom Dalton

I first started making signs back in the early 90's. On January first 2000 I started Signs Direct as an online company specializing in making sign purchases easy and economical. Signs Direct, Inc. specializes in traffic and parking signs, customized neon signs, sign holders and sign stands, as well as banners and sign making materials.

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Best Way to Get Store Traffic – Hand Drawn Signs

 

You’re walking down a sidewalk – which is more likely to catch your eye – a sidewalk sign with hand drawn art or a printed “Come on in, we’re open” sign? If you’re like most, the hand drawn art will get you every time. It makes the business feel more human, like the people inside really care and take pride in their store – whether it’s clothing or coffee. This video can show you how to create hand drawn art for your sidewalk signs, even if you aren’t an artist.

Tom Dalton

I first started making signs back in the early 90's. On January first 2000 I started Signs Direct as an online company specializing in making sign purchases easy and economical. Signs Direct, Inc. specializes in traffic and parking signs, customized neon signs, sign holders and sign stands, as well as banners and sign making materials.

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Handy Guide to Complying with OSHA Safety Sign Standards

OSHA Safety Sign Standards

The importance of safety signs cannot be overstated. It’s impossible to know how many lives workplace safety signs save per year, but people take notice when there isn’t a sign posted where one ought to be. Thanks to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), workers as well as the public at-large have come to expect the ever-present safety signs posted around industrial job sites. Through OSHA compliance, the resulting uniformity makes safety signs easy to understand, which is what makes them effective.

Hard Hat Area Sign

What is OSHA?

After President Richard Nixon signed the Occupational Safety and Health Act into law in 1971, OSHA was established as an agency in the U.S. Department of Labor. The agency is charged with enforcing workplace safety laws. OSHA also has regulatory powers, and they have created guidelines for a number of workplace safety processes and procedures.

There are OSHA regulations pertaining specifically to the design of OSHA safety signs. The regulations describe types of safety signs, and they also point to a set of design standards created by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) in the late 1960s. The ANSI standards have actually been updated since then, but as with the nature of governmental bureaucracy, they have not gone through the necessary approval process within OSHA to become official yet. Still, OSHA will make exceptions during their inspections if signs are up to the new ANSI standards, and still offer at least as much warning as they would under the official ANSI standards from the late 1960s that are recognized by OSHA.

What are the OSHA safety sign requirements?

What set of regulations would be complete without a definition of a basic word for which everyone takes for granted? In this case, the word is “sign”. OSHA defines a sign as a surface that contains warnings or instructions about nearby hazards for workers and the public at-large. OSHA specifically points out that news releases, safety posters and bulletins are not included in the definition of safety sign. In other words, having a safety poster won’t help a business become OSHA compliant. Where there are hazards, there needs to be safety signs warning of those hazards.

According to OSHA regulations, there are basically three different types of workplace safety signs. They are danger signs, caution signs and informational signs. To be OSHA compliant, a safety sign needs to conform to a specific set of colors which are dictated by on the type of sign being displayed. To simply describe the basic layout of a safety sign, it should be rectangular, consisting of a background, a colored panel at the top containing a signal word, and then an area for a message below it.

Danger signs

Danger signs should be used to signify an imminent threat such as radiation present in an area.  The OSHA regulations say there may be no variations made to their symbols and messaging as directed by the standards. A danger sign needs to specify that there is an immediate danger, and employees need to be trained to recognize that threat and act appropriately.

Danger signs need to be red, black and white as described in both the ANSI and OSHA standards.The sign background should be white and the panel at the top of the sign should be black.In the black panel, the word “Danger” should be white letters in a red circle. Any letters that appear on the white background should be black. Following these guidelines will make a danger sign OSHA compliant.

Warning signs

Warning signs should be used to warn against a potential hazard that could cause injury or death such as “Hot Surface”.  The OSHA regulations say there may be no variations made to their symbols and messaging as directed by the standards. A warning sign needs to specify that there is a potential danger, and employees need to be trained to recognize that dangerous condition and act appropriately.

Warning signs need to have an orange background with black lettering as described in both the ANSI and OSHA standards.  The panel at the top of the sign should be the black warning symbol.  In the black panel, the word “Warning” should be black letters in a horizontal rectangle. Any letters that appear on the orange background should be black. Following these guidelines will make a danger sign OSHA compliant.

Caution signs

Caution signs are used to warn of potentially hazardous situation or to caution against unsafe practices or inappropriate actions that could cause injury or death. One example may be a sign that says “Hard Hat Area” or “Watch for Forklifts”.  According to the OSHA rules about safety signs, employees need to be trained that these signs indicate that they need to take proper precautions while in that area to ensure safety and prevent accidents.

The ANSI standards for caution signs say they need to have a yellow background. Like danger signs, caution signs should also have a black panel up top. However, caution panels should have yellow letters for the word “caution” to comply with OSHA standards. Any letters appearing in the message below the panel will be on the yellow background and should be black.

Informational signs

Informational signs follow a similar uniformity as danger and caution signs, except info sign colors are white backgrounds with a green panel and white letters within the panel. Below the panel, the lettering on the white background of informational signs should be black to comply with ANSI standards.

Letters and Symbols

When it comes to lettering for safety signs, the information in the OSHA standards gives readability guidelines for letters ranging from 3.5 inches to a quarter-inch tall. Letters 3.5 inches tall are visible up to 200 to 210 feet away. One-inch letters can be read 60 to 65 feet away, and quarter-inch letters are visible from 15 to 20 feet.

ANSI Regulations

The OSHA standards for safety signs have yet to be updated. They cite standards created by ANSI from 1967 and 1968 currently; however there are new ANSI standards since 2011 governing signs. As long as protection offered by signs is equal to or greater than 2011 standards, then you should be covered when they’re formally accepted. Still, the new ANSI standards have not been formally adopted, and enforcement will still be based on the old ANSI standards.

The old standards for safety signs were found under ANSI Z35.1-1968 and ANSI Z53.1-1967. These sets of standards covered sign specifications and colors respectively. Today, ANSI has a number of standards to govern safety signs. The new standards are labeled as the ANSI Z535 standards. However, as mentioned above, the new standards have yet to officially become part of OSHA regulations.

Safety Signs & OSHA Compliance

Ultimately, the most important thing about safety signs is that they work. Safety signs must be uniform in design and easy-to-read while maintaining a concise message. OSHA standards say safety signs need enough necessary info to be understood. People should know at a glance what they should and shouldn’t do in an area. It’s easy to accomplish this if employers and sign makers maintain OSHA compliance on safety signs.

References

U.S. Department of Labor. (N.D.). “Specifications for accident prevention signs and tags.” OSHA. Retrieved from https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=standards&p_id=9794

U.S. Department of Labor. (22 February 2011). “Standard Interpretations” OSHA. Retrieved from https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=INTERPRETATIONS&p_id=27641

United States of America Standards Institute. (1968). “Specifications for Accident Prevention Signs.” Z53.1-1968. Retrieved from https://law.resource.org/pub/us/cfr/ibr/002/ansi.z35.1.1968.pdf.

Tom Dalton

I first started making signs back in the early 90's. On January first 2000 I started Signs Direct as an online company specializing in making sign purchases easy and economical. Signs Direct, Inc. specializes in traffic and parking signs, customized neon signs, sign holders and sign stands, as well as banners and sign making materials.

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